Slow Food Los Angeles

Good, clean and fair food access for all of L.A.

Time For Lunch Eat-ins: Hollywood

Thanks to Elisa Hunziker for capturing scenes at the Hollywood eat-in, displayed in the slide show below:


Terry and Wally August, proprietors of Fancifull Gift Baskets and Fine Foods, have been enthusiastic supporters of Slow Food Los Angeles and The Farmer’s Kitchen. When Slow Food USA put out the call for eat-in organizers, Terry and Wally offered to host an event and put Hollywood on the Time For Lunch map. As Terry noted, “I wanted an opportunity to bring our community together, meet neighbors, come to the table and share a meal. When I grew up we didn’t have ready access to sodas and fast foods like kids do today. I think this has to be a large part of the reason the childhood obesity rates have tripled in the last 20 years. I love few things more than sharing a meal with people; to do so while educating people on programs that are helping society is a perfect way to spend an afternoon.”

In that spirit, Terry and Wally and a team of volunteers including Elisa Hunziker, Andie Jones, Lois Sisco, Charlotte Hill, and Alexandra Romanoff coordinated an afternoon of children’s activities, letter writing and petition signing, and of course, sharing great food!

Several organizations contributed to the event and sent representatives, adding their perspectives to the conversations about school lunch and the changes Slow Food USA is proposing to the Child Nutrition Act: Chef E from The Farmer’s Kitchen, volunteers of Homegirl Cafe, and Megan Hanson of RootDownLA, whose video of RootDown’s programs was one of the hits of the gathering. As part of Whole Foods regional support of the Time For Lunch campaign, Pam Lee of Whole Foods West Hollywood also arranged for a donation of turkey chili and helped publicize the eat-in and the Time For Lunch petition among Whole Foods customers. Marley Coffee, Z Pizza, The Village restaurant, Pain Quotidien, The Village Cafe, and the Larchmont Larder donated pizzas, salad, lemonade, sandwiches, salads, and other dishes, adding to the potluck’s bounty:
fancifull-eat-inAll in all, nearly 85 people came together at Fancifull to focus on community and ways to improve the content and availability of school lunches. Shortly after the event, Terry noted:

They came out on Labor Day to support child nutrition, to seek solutions, and to enjoy being around others who want to affect positive change. They cooked something and showed up at a strange place to support an ideal. That is exceptional.

I did not know most of the people who came to our Eat-In. Some people came from flyers at Farmers’ Markets, some through Slow Food, some a friend had brought, saw a sign, whatever. But over and over again I heard, “we need to do this more often.” People were hungry for solutions.

Many thanks to Terry and Wally August and all the volunteers, donors, and participants who made the Hollywood eat-in part of the effort to find meaningful solutions to school lunch problems.

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